Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:59

Salmon Nation

Episode 3 focuses on efforts to restore areas that have been damaged by modern practices back to their original natural state. Sever organizations both public and private are featured including The Columbia Land Trust, The Audubon Society, and the Columbia Slough Watershed Council. Eating well features wild foods gathered from the natural environment and prepared as part of the GingerRoot Festival.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:58

Pollinators

This is a repeat and re-cut version of our featured program recorded August 2010. Three experts discuss the problems facing pollinators of all types but especially the honeybee. Mace Vaughn, director of pollinator conservation at the Xerces Society, Ramesh Sagili, Senior researcher at Oregon State University department of Horticulture, and Glen Andresen, a local bee keeper and master gardener are the guests. We also paid a visit to the Foothills Honey Company. Commercial bee producer and pollination service operator George Hansen takes to a blueberry farm to show us how the business works. George is worried about losses due to CCD and believes agricultural methods and the lack of sustainable practices are contributing to the problem. His operation tries to mitigate those problems.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:57

Cascadia

The land known as Cascadia covers the Pacific Northwest from British Columbia in Canada to the middle of California. Bisected by the Cascade mountain range this bio-region is diverse and beautiful. This episode focuses on the area and it's resources and the efforts of organizations to protect and preserve it. These include the Columbia Land Trust, Columbia Slough Watershed Council and the Audubon Society's backyard habitat program. Hidden Connections shows us hot to restore a sense of place to our lifestyles.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:56

Taholah and the Paddle to Quinault

This is the lead off to Part two of our series on Sustainable Cities and Urban Ecosystems. The first episode features the Paddle to Quinault canoe convergence and a close up look at native culture and sustainability as it pertains to the building of community and urban ecosystems. Cultural traditions such as canoe carving, dance and song are the backbone of sustainability in the Native American world. We also look at resource management with a visit to the tribal fish hatchery on Quinault lake in Washington State.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:54

Portland, A Model For Sustainability

The City of Portland Oregon has many contributors to the sustainability movement both public and private. We take a look at just a sampling of the programs in place that make Portland a model city for sustainability. These include the Portland Farmers Market, The Bureau of Environmental Services and Portland State University to discover why sustainability is academic.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:52

Fair Trade, Preserving Economic Integrity

Sustainable Today revisits a topic we covered in 2011. The interview features Katie Barrow, PR manager for Fair Trade USA. It is the only independent third party certifier of fair trade products in the US. Katie explains what fair trade is, its history and how it’s certified and verified. Social as well as economic impacts on developing world producers is examined.

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT: Portland Roasting Company. Managing Partner Mark Stell, takes us through "Direct relationships" and this company’s efforts to go straight to the source. They verify and certify all the coffee they buy directly without third party support. Money is channeled back to communities to solve problems of water quality, education and better growing techniques. Projects are designed to align with Millennium Development Goals. Portland Walk for Water is sponsored by the company to raise awareness and money for more projects.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:51

Goethermal

This episode is an updated version of a story we covered in 2011. Alex Sifford is a private consultant with Sifford Energy Services. Toni Boyd is the Assistant Director for the Geo Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology. Alex and Toni explain what geothermal energy is, where it comes from, and how it is used. Direct sources which use hot water from underground are district heating, electric power and other applications such as onion dehydration are described. In addition geothermal heat pumps transfer heat from the ground to a heat exchanger for home use are mentioned.

We also paid a visit to the campus of Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls, Oregon. OIT sits on top of an active geothermal zone. The university has installed the first geothermal electric power plant in the state. We visit the plant, learn how it works, and take a look at the educational programs that are developed out of the plant and other applications OIT enjoys due to it’s location near a geothermal water source. Then we'll show you how to go geothermal right in your own back yard with geothermal heat pumps. We'll take you to several installations to show what goes into a heat pump system, tax incentives and efficiencies.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:50

Karen Litfin Ecovillages Part 1

This is a special presentation of Sustainable Today. In January 2014 PhD professor at the University of Washington, Karen Litfin, shared her experience of visiting 14 ecovillages throughout the world. Sustainable Today covered her presentation at Portland State University and at Kailash EcoVillage in Portland Oregon. We present this special program in two parts. In this episode, Karen describes the fundamentals that have made these ecovillage possible and viable alternatives to the current consumptive and exploitative systems that we live with today.

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:48

Karen Litfin Ecovillages Part 2

This is a special presentation of Sustainable Today. In January 2014 PhD professor at the University of Washington, Karen Litfin, shared her experience of visiting 14 ecovillages throughout the world. Sustainable Today covered her presentation at Portland State University and at Kailash EcoVillage in Portland Oregon. We present this special program in two parts. In the second episode, Karen describes the villages themselves and points out the premise upon which they were founded, the pros and cons of each and their special features and activities.

 

Sunday, 03 January 2016 17:46

Slow Food

Americans don't eat well. The consequences are obvious. Sickness, allergies and obesity to name a few. Fast food is all too common. But in this episode we present SLOW FOOD. Through the auspices of Slow Food Portland we present the highlights of Tedx Manhattan, "Changing the Way We Eat." It explores how to do it, why to do it, and where to do it. We'll take you to a couple of slow food farms to investigate Aquapoics at the Ingenuity Innovation Center, and a new way to feed people at Heart 2 Heart Farms. Hidden Connections point out the hidden ingredients in our food and how to find out what we are eating.

Bringing You the Tools to be Sustainable Today

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